Summer on W 84th St




A very typical Upper West Side Street.

Pearl Street


Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan. A few doors away from Fraunces Tavern, which dates to the colonial era, although I cannot vouch that this building is from the 1700s.

One Way, No Standing


Kayaks on the Hudson


Kayaks are available to use free at several locations along the Hudson. When I went by this location at about 72nd Street on Sunday Aug 4, the location was closing.

Raise Plow

Raise that (%^&*$( Plow


In case you're driving with your snowplow down on Columbus Avenue in June be prepared to raise that sucker.

The Hudson Hotel at 356 West 58th Street, betw...
The Hudson Hotel at 356 West 58th Street, between Columbus Circle and Ninth Avenue in Manhattan, New York City (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Columbus Avenue, by Lewis, Thomas, d. 1901
Columbus Avenue, by Lewis, Thomas, d. 1901 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
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Ducks on the Hudson

Waterfowl on the Hudson


Could someone help me out here? I'm a city boy. I don't know whether these are ducks or geese or swans. Or something else.

The picture was taken as I was leaning over the rail of the Hudson River Park in the 20s.
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Dylan's Candy Bar

Dylan's Candy Bar



Dylan's Candy Bar is a very popular confection shop at the corner of 60th St and Third Ave. Across Third Ave is Bloomingdale's, also a very popular shopping spot, but for reasons that are somewhat different from those of Dylan's.

Dylan's holds its own as a place to buy ice cream confections despite the presence down 60th St (behind the position of the photographer of this shot) of Serendipity. I would like to be the judge of a serious contest comparing the deliciousness of the products of these two establishments.
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Ft Tryon Park



2012, last year


  1. Thoroughly enjoy walks thru Heather's Garden Ft. Tryon Park ! Peace & beauty always in bloom!
  2. WORD & MUSIC AT THE FALLEN FLAGPOLE is a music & poetry event at Ft Tryon Park, part of & 's .
  3. I just moved uptown to inwood today - a few blocks from Ft Tryon Park
  4. Medieval art? Have you ever visited the Cloisters in Ft Tryon Park? Then you can go to the Met that same day, too. Admission is for BOTH...

A Twelfth-Century Baptismal Font from Wellen

JC GHISLAIN - Metropolitan Museum Journal, 2009
Alittle-known baptismal font at The Cloisters? a large circular Romanesque basin
ornamented with a frieze of semicircular arcades and four large, pro jecting male heads
supported by blind arches with tubular bases (Figures 1-5)? is a particularly fine example ...
 

An historical analysis of young people's use of public space, parks and playgrounds in New York City

PJ Wridt - Children Youth and Environments, 2004
In this paper I present childhood biographies of three people who grew up in or near a
public housing development located on the border between the contrasting communities of
Yorkville and East Harlem in New York City. Stories of their middle childhood (ages 11-13) ...

The Cloisters-the building and the collection of mediaeval art, in fort tryon park

JJ Rorimer - 1951
... Author: Rorimer, James J. Title of Source: The Cloisters - the building and the collection of
mediaeval art, in fort tryon park Publisher/Distributor: Metropolitan museum of art
Publisher/Distributor City: New york, ny Date of Publication: 1951
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Roofline 4

Riverside Drive


Riverside Drive next to Riverside Park in the low 80s on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

Shall I tell you a secret? The benches along Riverside Drive are one of the best places to enjoy bagels with cream cheese and coffee from Zabar's on a sunny day.
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Roofline 3


Dormer window. Imagine how hot that top floor apartment becomes in Summer. Maybe they had a heat-tolerance gene in the 1890s, when this building was built. But people have lost that gene in the century since then. I sure have.

Of the four snaps in this series, this visual shows the most roofline fascia. Not a lot, just a smidge. According to our trusty wikipedia,
Fascia is a term used in architecture to refer to a frieze or band running horizontally and situated vertically under the roof edge or which forms the outer surface of a cornice and is visible to an outside observer.
Betcha you thought 'fascia' was a political term.
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